Fall 2015 School YELP Programs

October 20, 2015: Salida Middle School 6th grade Fall YELP fieldtrip

The Salida Middle School 6th Grade Class gathered at Mount Ouray State Wildlife Area for the annual GARNA Youth Ecological Literacy Field Trip. With the newly snow-capped Collegiate Peaks as the backdrop and the wildlife-rich riparian bottomlands of the Arkansas River as their classroom, students rotated between 4 environmental education stations designed to engage the senses, hone scientific exploration and analysis skills, and encourage stewardship. Topics included bat ecology, water quality and aquatic insects, erosion and the rock cycle, and GPS navigation. During lunch, students discussed conservation ethics and enjoyed a fly fishing demonstration.

A huge thank you to: Michelle Orlowske, AHRA Land Ranger, Christy Fitzpatrick, Chaffee County 4H, Maggie Gaddis, Rocky Mountain Field Institute, Keith Krebs, Collegiate Peaks Chapter of Trout Unlimited, Debby Powers and Paul Smith, GARNA volunteers; the 6th grade teaching team: George Mossman, Jean Dyer, Cory Scheffel and Michael Williams; and all of the 6th grade SMS students.

Some press from The Mountain Mail:

Mountain Mail article 10-22-15

September 24, 2015: Longfellow Elementary 3rd grade Fall YELP fieldtrip

3rd grade YELPThe Longfellow 3rd grade class gathered at Monarch Pass and Maysville Picnic Area for the annual GARNA Youth Ecological Literacy Field Trip. With Monarch Pass as their classroom at 11,312 feet, students hiked up the Pass and directly observed the geology and life zones of the treeline. Below, at the Maysville site, students practiced compass navigation and explored behavior and ecology of our friend, the bat. Rotating between four environmental education stations designed to engage the senses, hone scientific exploration and analysis skills, and encourage stewardship, students became more aware of the natural world around them.

A huge thank you to: Linda Skinner, BLM Outdoor Recreation Planner, Bob Hickey, AHRA Volunteer, Kate Spinelli, AHRA Naturalist, Debby Powers, Patty Powers, Sally Waterhouse, Paul Smith and Claire Mechtley, GARNA volunteers; the 3rd grade teaching team: Mark Tameler, Carol McIlvaine, Jaime Giorno, April Holdinghaus and Janee Martinez; and all of the 3rd grade Longfellow students.

September 21, 2015: GARNA and Trout Unlimited work with Salida High School biology classes

Tenderfoot Times article




Camp Fridays Fall 2015

Pumpkin Patch FridayCamp Friday: October 9, 2015
Pumpkin Patch Cache with the City of Salida, GARNA and Guidestone

Local youth gathered at the Hutchinson Homestead for the annual Guidestone Pumpkin Patch to learn and practice their compass navigation skills. Held on a course tucked among golden grasses, trees, and a hay bale maze, children worked in pairs to follow compass bearings to flagged points, eventually leading to a pumpkin cache destination. Each child took home a mini pumpkin as a prize to remember their accomplishment.

 

 

 

Friday spur trailCamp Friday: October 16, 2015
Understanding Human Impacts on the Monarch Spur Trail with the City of Salida, GARNA and Chaffee County 4-H

A group of local little ones gathered for a day of environmental education on the Monarch Spur Trail in Salida. The site of the Salida Trail Ecological Restoration Project, the trail was a perfect backdrop for kids to learn about human impacts on nature and ways they can help improve natural areas in their own backyard. Students identified natural and un-natural objects on the trail, played games to understand how long trash takes to break down, picked up micro-trash, and learned techniques for observing and connecting to nature.




Video of Lost Lake hike

GARNA member Judy Haines put together a beautiful compilation of photographs from a GARNA Photography Club hike to Lost Lake in August, 2015. Please consider becoming a member to join us for club activities like this!




Video of Zapata Ranch

Zapata Ranch

GARNA member Judy Haines put together a beautiful compilation of photographs from a GARNA-sponsored trip to the Zapata Ranch on October 6, 2015. All participants on this trip were GARNA members – we publicize activities to supporters first, please consider becoming a member to join us for experiences like this!




Video of Zapata Falls

Zapata Falls

GARNA member Judy Haines put together a beautiful compilation of photographs from a GARNA-sponsored trip to the Zapata Falls on October 6, 2015. All participants on this trip were GARNA members – we publicize activities to supporters first, please consider becoming a member to join us for experiences like this!




Video of Orient Bat Cave trip

GARNA member Judy Haines documented our trip to the Orient Mine in the San Luis Valley on August 27, 2015. Thanks so much to Judy for sharing this enchanting experience. We hope you can join us for the next GARNA activity that intrigues you!

 

bats at orient

Photo courtesy of Orient Land Trust




Stage & Rail Trail draft Master Plan completed

SRT team

Alison Ramsey, GARNA ED, Jim Houk, Thomas & Thomas, Kathy McCoy and Alan Robinson, S&RT Coordinator

MAJOR MILESTONE: The Leadville Stage Road study (now known as the Stage & Rail Trail) has just published the draft MASTER PLAN. To learn more – and to download the plan’s maps or the full draft plan, go to www.garna.org/stageandrail/ The draft is now in the hands of potential implementing managers, including the Boards of commissioners for Lake and Chaffee Counties (Colorado) and the Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area.




GARNA’s 2015 environmental presentation and annual meeting

annual mtg tableGARNA held its environmental presentation and annual on February 5, 2015. This year’s presenter was Dr. Richard Reading, Vice President for Conservation and founder of the Department of Conservation Biology at the Denver Zoological Foundation. Dr. Reading has conducted research or consulted on conservation projects in several countries on 5 continents, primarily the Great Plains of the U.S., the Gobi Desert of Mongolia, and the Kalahari of Botswana. A major focus of Rich’s research has been on developing interdisciplinary approaches to conservation.

Dr Reading discussed how the role of zoos has changed dramatically over the past few decades from a focus primarily on “ghee whiz” recreation to a science-based focus on conservation. Today, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums requires that institutions conduct conservation programs to receive accreditation. The presentation reviewed the change in approach of zoos over time and shared how the Denver Zoo has developed a field-based conservation program that supports about 100 conservation projects in dozens of countries around the world.

Dr Reading’s entire presentation can be viewed HERE.

We were proud to present Cookie Perl, Pat Duletsky and Boyd Clark GARNA’s 2014 Volunteer of the Year awards. And, on behalf of all of our volunteers, GARNA honored the Salida-area Parks, Open-space and Trails with our annual volunteer recognition award.




2014 GARNA Annual Report

2014 GARNA Annual Report – Overview of GARNA’s activities, accomplishments and financials.

Annual report cover




Exposing young people to careers in natural resources – PLACE program

PLACE fall 2014On November 21, four high school students moved one giant rock and learned how to place water bars on a trail reroute of an area known as “Collarbone Corner” on the Midland Trail. Students were participating in the first of 8 GARNA Public Land Agency Career Exploration (PLACE) program days, with a goal to expose greater Arkansas River region high school students to career paths within the natural resource agencies that partner with GARNA. The partner agency for the first PLACE day was the Bureau of Land Management, and Bryce Hofmann, BLM Recreational Technician, helped students work as a team to place a “step-down” rock. Alan Robinson and Lyn Berry, GARNA volunteers representing Friends of Fourmile, introduced students to the history of the modern Midland Trail, including the important role the Friends of Fourmile play in helping the BLM maintain good stewardship of the area’s resources and maintaining balance among various recreational uses in the area.